It’s no secret that continuing on to higher education after graduating high school or earning your GED will open you up to even more opportunities, but there are many ways you can obtain a higher education without breaking the bank. There are plenty of options for those wanting to further their education, here we’ll go over a few of those options.

Scheduling

Fortunately, many higher education programs are attainable whilst holding down a day job or attending other general education classes. Many programs and colleges offer different course schedules, like night classes, summer semesters, online courses, or even fast-tracked programs, allowing you to complete the course by spending more time in class each day and ultimately shaving a few months off your education.

Certificate Program

Certificate programs are offered in a wide variety of career paths and skilled trades with varying educational requirements. Colleges around the US offer certificate programs in areas like accounting or even becoming a computer support specialist.

Certificate programs make it easier to obtain the knowledge, certification and licensing necessary to succeed in an essential field. For example, in our world that is overrun with technology, IT specialists will always be in high demand. Enrolling in a computer support specialist program will allow you to hone your skills, increase your passion for all things tech, and allow you to help people with your specialized skill set and knowledge. Many IT support careers will afford you the opportunity to work both remotely, and in-person with customers creating the perfect blend of customer service and tech repair and troubleshooting.

Gen Eds

Just because you haven’t settled on an academic discipline to major in doesn’t mean you should put off attending college, you can take this time to get a head start on fulfilling your general education requirements, which typically include math courses, language requirements, and a few base-level science classes, all the while exploring new subjects and areas of study you may want to major in later. Whether you plan on attending community college, state college, or a university, you should have no problem knocking out these required classes, making it so you can put all of your focus on the classes specific to your major and career path.

Even if you decided to switch schools in the middle of your collegiate career, many of these credits are transferable, meaning you likely won’t have to retake many — if any of these classes upon your transfer.

Online Schooling

Juggling an inflexible class schedule with work, family time, and your social life can make it hard to complete your degree or certificate program as attending in-person classes like labs and lectures isn’t a feasible option for everyone, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t further your education.

Online schooling will allow you to work around your already busy schedule, while also saving on the cost of commuting and campus parking as well as the various other costs coupled with in-person classes. Even if you don’t choose to fully attend school online, you’ll save a lot of time and money while working toward your degree.

Skilled Trade

Many skilled trades allow you to maintain a hefty paycheck whilst working in a specialized trade, like masonry, as an electronics, and auto repair. Programs that result in certifications or licensing, like automotive and diesel certifications offer the opportunity for plenty of hands-on training, meaning that upon the completion of your certification, you’ll be ready to enter the workforce, armed with plenty of work experience.

Furthering your education and increasing your job prospects doesn’t mean you’ll spend years and years in and out of school and put yourself in thousands of dollars of debt. Make your education manageable by making your education work for you.